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Frank Lloyd Wright Homes You Can Rent for the Weekend


Frank Lloyd Wright was one of America’s most famous architects. As an antithesis to Victorian architecture, Wright pioneered Prairie-style buildings, structures easily identified by features such as low-pitched roofs, overhanging eaves, a central chimney, and open floor plans. This hallmark style gave rise to Usonian architecture, Wright’s later-in-life simple, stylish small homes designed especially for the American middle class. He died in 1959 with a portfolio of over 1,100 buildings across the world to his name, the Guggenheim being one of them. Below, we’ve rounded up three of his homes across the country that you can rent for the weekend.

Eppstein House_Hotels Above Par

Eppstein House

Located in Galesburg, Michigan, Wright built this home in 1947 for famous research scientist Samuel Eppstein and his wife Dorothy, a pilot in the US air force during the second world war. The space is pure Usonian architecture and part of a community called The Acres — a neighborhood where 21 of these homes were to be built; however, only four ended up constructed. Original furnishings are intact — including art pieces and the dining table — which conjoin upgraded modern appliances for a mid-century-meets-new-age stay.

Emil Bach House_Hotels Above Par

Emil Bach House (@EmilBachHouse)

Frank Lloyd Wright’s only home in Chicago, this 1915-built wonder is located on the city’s North Side. The house is a fusion between the architect’s famous Prairie-style design and hallmark styles of his future work, including contained geometry and modern window implementation. The home has a Japanese Tea Room & garden, king & queen rooms, study, and an expansive lounge and dining space flourishing with natural light.

Schwartz House_Hotels Above Par

Schwartz House

Located in Twin Rivers, Wisconsin, this four-bedroom home accommodates eight people. Wright designed the space as part of the 1938 LIFE Magazine “Eight Houses for Modern Living” project, which asked eight architects to conceptualize a “dream home” for middle-class Americans. The editors praised him. He was eventually commissioned to build the home with a few modifications, a rare two-story Usonian-style space constructed with red tidewater cypress board, and batten & red brick.

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